Migration in the Russian Federation today

The article overviews immigration in the Russian Federation in the period 2015-2017 and analyses the situation faced by people with a migrant background in Russia. A detailed description is given of regions that are popular among immigrants and the underlying reasons for their choices. Foreigners' purpose for being in Russia and their impact on the Russian economy is also studied. Statistics show that Moscow, the Moscow Region, Saint-Petersburg, the Leningrad and Voronezh Regions, along with the Krasnodar Territory attract most immigrants with their high economic level and many work places. Ever more people have recently been arriving in the Novosibirsk and Tyumen Regions (industrial regions), drawn by the greater job opportunities and relatively high payments for workers made by regional enterprises there. Immigrants typically come to Russia from ex-USSR (post-Soviet) states for employment (long-, short-term, seasonal) reasons. Over 80% of immigrants in Russia are men in their active working age. The article also considers statistics on refugees and people without Russian citizenship. The research looks at the Russian Federation's migration policy that aims to help immigrants assimilate and live comfortably in Russia while also ensuring the country's national security and economic stability. The article relies on data from the Federal Migration Service, the Federal State Statistics Service, the Main Directorate for Migration of the Ministry of Internal Affairs, and the Central Bank of the Russian Federation.

Publisher
Ljubljana University, Faculty of Social Sciences
Number of issue
6
Language
English
Pages
969-989
Status
Published
Volume
54
Year
2017
Organizations
  • 1 Faculty of the Russian Language and General Educational Disciplines, RUDN University, Moscow, Russian Federation
Keywords
Immigrants; Migration situation in Russia; Migration sources; Russian state migration policy
Date of creation
19.10.2018
Date of change
15.03.2021
Short link
https://repository.rudn.ru/en/records/article/record/5210/
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