Iron and advanced glycation end products: Emerging role of iron in androgen deficiency in obesity

The literature suggests a bidirectional relationship between testosterone (T) and iron, but mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unclear. We investigated effects of iron on advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in obesity-related androgen deficiency. In total, 111 men were recruited, and iron biomarkers and N(E)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) were measured. In an animal study, rats were fed a 50% high-fat diet (HFD) with (0.25, 1, and 2 g ferric iron/kg diet) or without ferric citrate for 12 weeks. Obese rats supplemented with >1 g iron/kg diet had decreased testicular total T compared to HFD alone. Immunohistochemical staining showed that >1 g of ferric iron increased iron and AGE retention in testicular interstitial tissues, which is associated with increased expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), tumor necrosis factor-α, and nitric oxide. Compared with normal weight, overweight/obese men had lower T levels and higher rates of hypogonadism (19% vs. 11.3%) and iron overload (29.8% vs.15.9%). A correlation analysis showed serum total T was positively correlated with transferrin saturation (r = 0.242, p = 0.007) and cathepsin D (r = 0.330, p = 0.001), but negatively correlated with red blood cell aggregation (r = −0.419, p<0.0001) and CML (r = −0.209, p < 0.05). In conclusion, AGEs may partially explain the underlying relationship between dysregulated iron and T deficiency. © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Authors
Chen S.-H.1 , Yuan K.-C.2 , Lee Y.-C.3 , Shih C.-K.4 , Tseng S.-H.5, 6 , Tinkov A.A. 7, 8, 9 , Skalny A.V. 7, 8, 9 , Chang J.-S.4, 10, 11, 12
Journal
Publisher
MDPI AG
Number of issue
3
Language
English
Status
Published
Number
261
Volume
9
Year
2020
Organizations
  • 1 Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 110, Taiwan
  • 2 Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 110, Taiwan
  • 3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 110, Taiwan
  • 4 School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 110, Taiwan
  • 5 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 110, Taiwan
  • 6 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 110, Taiwan
  • 7 Department of Medical Elementology, Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Moscow, 117198, Russian Federation
  • 8 Laboratory of Biotechnology and Applied Bioelementology, Yaroslavl State University, Yaroslavl, 150003, Russian Federation
  • 9 Laboratory of Molecular Dietology, IM Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, 119146, Russian Federation
  • 10 Graduate Institute of Metabolism and Obesity Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 110, Taiwan
  • 11 Nutrition Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 110, Taiwan
  • 12 Chinese Taipei Society for the Study of Obesity (CTSSO), Taipei, 110, Taiwan
Keywords
Advanced glycation end products; Fat; Iron; Obesity; Testis; Testosterone
Date of creation
02.11.2020
Date of change
02.11.2020
Short link
https://repository.rudn.ru/en/records/article/record/64952/
Share

Other records